Cincinnati Weather

Cincinnati WeatherWinter
Snowfall in Cincinnati is lower than most of the rest of Ohio, though citizens can expect at least 14-16 inches of snowfall during the winter. This means that people can take advantage of winter sports. Winter temperatures range from 20-40 degrees and the area is often rainy. Winter is mild compared to the rest of Ohio.

Spring
Spring in Cincinnati is rainy and it is best to take an umbrella everywhere. The temperatures range from 40-60 degrees. In general, late April and early May are the rainiest and windiest months in the spring and throughout the year.

Summer
Summer is the hottest season of the year, with temperatures averaging from 70-90 degrees. Adding the humidity to this heat creates a warm humid summer. However this allows homeowners to grow many plants and trees that gardeners consider "southern" and still survive the winter.

Fall
Falls are short but mild, with many citizens seeing a mild Indian summer turning into winter. The days are warm and the evenings are cooler, requiring a sweater or light jacket. Temperatures average between low 80s in September to as low in the 40s in November so there is a large temperature variation. Like the other seasons, the fall can be rainy.

Climate Information
On average, 186 days of the year are cloudy and the average wind speed is 10 m/h. Like many parts of the Midwest, Cincinnati sees strong thunderstorms and sometimes tornadoes throughout the spring, summer, and fall. The total annual snowfall is 23 inches, but this is variable.

The dew point, which can be a good measure of how comfortable a person would be, shows that residents of Cincinnati are often the most comfortable from late April to early June and early September to late October.

Because of its location, Cincinnati can feel the effects of large storm systems, like hurricanes, especially those originating in the Gulf of Mexico. Also while it generally has a mild winter, Cincinnati can be affected by large snow systems such as when it was buried in snow during the Blizzard of 1977 and again in 1978.